APTA-Oregon Virtual Annual Conference Detailed Speaker Information

Saturday March 12th, 2022

Tentative Time Track and CEUS Activity

8:15 AM – 9:45 AM

1.5 CEUs

Keynote Session - Trauma Informed Care as Providers in the Midst of Trauma. How do you Bring your Whole Self to the Clinical Space?

Presenter: Nicole Piemonte, PhD

Speaker Bio: Nicole Piemonte, PhD, is the Assistant Dean for Student Affairs and a faculty member in the Department of Medical Humanities at Creighton University School of Medicine, Phoenix Regional Campus. She also holds the Peekie Nash Carpenter Endowed Chair in Medicine at Creighton University. Nicole received her PhD in Medical Humanities from The University of Texas Medical Branch where she studied continental philosophy, medical ethics, literature and medicine, and medical pedagogy. Her current teaching and research focus on incorporating the humanities into medical education in order to cultivate future physicians who are attuned to suffering, mortality, vulnerability, and social justice. At Creighton, she designed and leads the medical humanities curriculum that is embedded throughout the four years of students’ training in the School of Medicine, and she also co-directs and teaches in the Masters of Medical Humanities program. Her first book, Afflicted: How Vulnerability Can Heal Medical Education and Practice, was published in January 2018 with The MIT Press, and her second book with The MIT Press, Death and Dying, was released in September 2021.

 10:00 AM – 11:00 AM

Track A (1 CEU)

F-words in Early Intervention

Description: During a recent scoping review, a core set of interventions was identified and organized for families and early interventionists to ensure family-professional partnership and high quality evidence-based interventions, that should be standard of care for all infants and children with CP and/or at risk for CP. By attending this symposium, participants will how to implement a standardized core set of education tools and intervention based on the F-words (Function, Family, Fun, Fitness, Friends, and Future) framework. Through knowledge-translation strategies, participants will also be able to translate scientific recommendations into early interventions applied to different contexts, including low-resource settings.

Learning Objectives:

  • List 5 F-Words and their corresponding ICF categories
  • Describe the "ingredients" of a therapy intervention that correspond with each "F-word"
  • Describe why "f-words" might be more effective that "hands-on" and/or "passive" interventions
  • Be able to use two respurces for more information about "f-words"

Presenter: Dr. Ginny Paleg, PT, MPT, DScPT

Speaker Bio: Ginny Paleg is a pediatric physiotherapist from Silver Spring, Maryland, USA. For the past 17 years, she has worked with children aged 0-3 years in homes and childcare. Ginny earned her master’s degree in physical therapy at Emory University and her DScPT at the University of Maryland Baltimore. Ginny specializes in posture and mobility assessment and interventions for children at GMFCS Levels IV and V. She is certified in Prechtl General Movement Assessment (GMA) and the Hammersmith Infant Neurological Exam (HINE) and trained in Routines Based Interventions (McMaster) and coaching (Sheldon and Rush). She has published over 15 peer-reviewed journal articles on standing, gait trainers, and power mobility. She is the lead author for the American Academy of Cerebral Palsy Hypotonia Care Pathway. She is the Incoming Chair of the AACPDM Communications Committee (2021-2023). Her latest publications are a case study on a child with “treated type 1 SMA” and a study on weight bearing in various positions in 3 models of standers

10:00 AM – 11:00 AM

Track B (1 CEU)

Constraints-Based Approach to ACLR Rehab (Part 1)

Description: The rate of second ACL injury after ACL reconstruction (ACLR) is unacceptably high. There are many factors that likely drive this, but rehabilitation has the potential to makes the situation unintentionally worse. Athletes are made up of complex systems that respond in unique ways when returning to sport after ACLR – but that doesn’t mean that the rehab needs to be complicated. Making sure that adequate capacities are in place to support those complex adaptations is a great place to start. This two-part lecture will explore the way that humans develop movement solutions and how the environment after ACLR may create specific stumbling blocks. Understanding basic biomechanics and how the human body is driven to develop functional strategies is key to making sure that the proper foundations for returning to cutting and pivoting sports. By using a constraints-based approach, clinicians can better understand how to support the athlete as the clinician and the athlete develop optimal rehab together.

Learning Objectives: 

  • Give a basic description of dynamical systems and how that applies to rehabilitation
  • Explain the likely mechanisms/situations for 2nd ACL injury
  • Describe the differences between impulse, peak force, and rate of force development
  • Prioritize primary goals of postoperative rehabilitation to maximize return to sport function

Presenter: Dr. Eric Meira, PT, DPT

Speaker Bio: Erik Meira, PT, DPT is currently the director of the Physical Therapy Science Communication Group based out of Portland, OR, USA, a company that specializes in sports rehabilitation and education, and is a clinical advisor to the University of Portland NCAA Division I program. He is a frequent consultant for organizations within the NCAA, NBA, NFL, MLS, WNSL, and other elite sports leagues. Dr. Meira has authored several articles and textbook chapters and lectures internationally in small private team settings all the way through being the keynote speaker at large professional conferences.

10:00 - 12:00 PM

Track C (2 CEUs)

Don’t Be Surprised Regarding the Good Faith Estimate Requirement

Description: The No Surprises Act was enacted as part of the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2021, which became law on December 27, 2020. Subpart G – Protection of Uninsured or Self-Pay Individuals, does apply to outpatient physical, therapy services provided in all outpatient therapy settings, including private practices and does include cash-based therapy practices as well as out-of-network providers.

On July 13, 2021, 4 Agencies, including the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS), Department of Health and Human Services published an interim final rule titled Requirements Related to Surprise Billing; Part 1 in the Federal Register. On October 7, 2021, 4 Agencies, including CMS published an interim final rule titled Requirements Related to Surprise Billing; Part 2 in the Federal Register.

This webinar will teach participants what they need to know regarding Part 149 – Surprise Billing and Transparency Requirements, Subpart G – Protection of Uninsured or Self-Pay Individuals of the No Surprises Act that went into effect on January 1, 2022. Subpart G – Protection of Uninsured or Self-Pay Individuals, does apply to outpatient physical therapy services provided in all outpatient therapy settings, including private practices and does include cash-based therapy practices as well as out-of-network providers. Essentially, if you provide outpatient physical therapy services, this Good Faith Estimate requirement applies to you.

Learning Objectives: 

  • Identify who the Good Faith Estimate requirement applies to
  • Understand the various definitions associated with § 149.610 Requirements for provision of good faith estimates of expected charges for uninsured (or self-pay) individuals
  • Define who is an uninsured or self-pay individual
  • Explain what must be posted on your website and in your office regarding the Good Faith Estimate
  • Discuss the timeframes in which a Good Faith Estimate must be provided to an individual
  • List the content requirements of what must be included in a Good Faith Estimate
  • Understand the requirements for a Good Faith Estimate for recurring outpatient therapy services
  • Express how a Good Faith Estimate can be delivered to an uninsured/self-pay individual
  • Recite how close the actual patient payment must be when compared to the Good Faith Estimate of expected charges

Presenter: Rick Gawenda, PT

Speaker Bio: Rick Gawenda, P.T., graduated in 1991 with a Bachelor of Science in Physical Therapy from Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan. Mr. Gawenda is currently the President and founder of Gawenda Seminars & Consulting, Inc. He has provided valuable education and consulting to hospitals, rehabilitation agencies, private practices, nursing homes, and his peers in the areas of CPT and ICD-10 coding, billing, documentation, reimbursement, and compliance as it pertains to outpatient therapy services as well as denial management and the appeals process for Medicare denied claims. Mr. Gawenda’s website, www.gawendaseminars.com, provides a valuable source of information on rehabilitation rules and regulations, coding, documentation, and reimbursement. Mr. Gawenda is a member of the American Physical Therapy Association (APTA) and Michigan Physical Therapy Association (MPTA). Mr. Gawenda is the Past President of the Section on Health Policy & Administration of the APTA as well as Past President of the Michigan Association of Medical Rehabilitation Program Administrators. Mr. Gawenda is also the author of “The How-To Manual for Rehab Documentation: A Complete Guide to Increasing Reimbursement and Reducing Denials” and “Coding and Billing For Outpatient Rehab Made Easy: Proper Use of CPT Codes, ICD-9 Codes and Modifiers”.

11:00 AM – 12:00 PM

Track A (1 CEU)

All Solutions are NOT Alike

Description: Older adults often experience safety and mobility issues due to a variety of co-morbidities, cognitive changes, and functional limitations. This is referred to aging into a disability. A portion of the population also age WITH a disability, with the onset of disability experienced earlier in life. These two pathways regarding risk factors and mobility considerations are similar but not the same.

The purpose of this 1-hour interactive course is to consider practical strategies related to wheeled mobility evaluation and training for older adults in both categories. 

This course will provide an overview of seating and wheeled mobility considerations for these two older adult groups, including the clinical decision-making process.  The best practice applications of manual wheelchairs; power assist technology; power wheelchair and power seat functions to promote safety, mobility and independence will be discussed. Wheelchair skills training techniques to ensure the client’s understanding of the equipment and to promote effective and safe use of the device will be reviewed. This will include, but not be limited to, strategies for optimal outcomes in seating, driving, and power seat function utilization.   

Clinical evidence and case examples will be utilized to demonstrate best practice for seating and mobility solutions for this population.

By the end of this course, clinicians will have a better understanding of the changes that older adults or clients aging with a disability experience, as well as the ability to utilize best practice decision making in recommendations and training related to wheelchair seating and mobility for these individuals.

Learning Objectives:

  • Describe 2 differences experienced by those aging into disability versus aging with a disability
  • Apply 3 clinical considerations for manual wheelchair configuration to improve ease of mobility and safety for the older adult population experiencing disability
  • Apply 3 clinical rationale for recommendation of power assist technology or power wheelchairs to benefit mobility and safety for the older adult population experiencing disability
  • Discuss 3 training technique considerations for successful use of seating and wheeled mobility equipment for the older adult population experiencing disability

Presenter:  Catherine Sweeney, PT, ATP/SMS

Speaker Bio: Catherine Sweeney, PT, RESNA-certified ATP/SMS, and Regional Clinical Education Manager for Permobil in the Pacific Northwest. Since graduating from Marquette University in Milwaukee, WI in 1990, Catherine has gained extensive clinical experience in acute care, acute rehabilitation, and out-patient settings with a primary focus on neurologic rehabilitation. Prior to joining the clinical education team at Permobil team in September of 2019, Catherine worked at Providence St. Joseph Medical Center in Portland, Oregon, serving as the lead clinician for the wheelchair seating clinic program. Catherine applies and promotes clinical best practice to achieve appropriate wheelchair seating outcomes for clients using wheeled mobility. 

11:00 AM – 12:00 PM

 Track B (1 CEU)

Constraints-Based Approach to ACLR Rehab (Part 2)

Description: The rate of second ACL injury after ACL reconstruction (ACLR) is unacceptably high. There are many factors that likely drive this, but rehabilitation has the potential to makes the situation unintentionally worse. Athletes are made up of complex systems that respond in unique ways when returning to sport after ACLR – but that doesn’t mean that the rehab needs to be complicated. Making sure that adequate capacities are in place to support those complex adaptations is a great place to start. This two-part lecture will explore the way that humans develop movement solutions and how the environment after ACLR may create specific stumbling blocks. Understanding basic biomechanics and how the human body is driven to develop functional strategies is key to making sure that the proper foundations for returning to cutting and pivoting sports. By using a constraints-based approach, clinicians can better understand how to support the athlete as the clinician and the athlete develop optimal rehab together.

Learning Objectives:

  • Give a basic description of dynamical systems and how that applies to rehabilitation
  • Explain the likely mechanisms/situations for 2nd ACL injury
  • Describe the differences between impulse, peak force, and rate of force development
  • Prioritize primary goals of postoperative rehabilitation to maximize return to sport function

Presenter: Dr. Eric Meira, PT, DPT

Speaker Bio: Erik Meira, PT, DPT is currently the director of the Physical Therapy Science Communication Group based out of Portland, OR, USA, a company that specializes in sports rehabilitation and education, and is a clinical advisor to the University of Portland NCAA Division I program. He is a frequent consultant for organizations within the NCAA, NBA, NFL, MLS, WNSL, and other elite sports leagues. Dr. Meira has authored several articles and textbook chapters and lectures internationally in small private team settings all the way through being the keynote speaker at large professional conferences.

1:00 pm - 2:00 pm

Afternoon Session 1 (1 CEU)

Early Career Bridge Program

Description: This course will discuss the unique professional needs of students and early career physical therapists that influence membership value, engagement, and leadership within APTA Oregon. This session will describe the development and implementation of the Early Career Bridge Program, a pilot program which took place in 2020 to facilitate mentor-mentee relationships between early career leaders and student physical therapists within APTA Oregon. This course will include a panel discussion with program participants and ask audience members to engage in discussion about the future plans for this program and other member demographics that may benefit from a structured mentorship program.  

Learning Objectives: 

  • After participating in this session, attendees will be able to identify factors influencing state association membership in early career and student physical therapist member groups.
  • After participating in this session, attendees will be able to identify the benefits of structured mentorship for professional development and association membership.
  • After participating in this session, attendees will be able to describe the Oregon Early Career Bridge Program pilot model, including successes and areas for improvement.
  • While participating in this session, attendees will contribute ideas for mentorship program expansion, including identifying other areas of member needs.

Presenters: 

Sydney Neumann, SPT

 

Tabitha Galindo, PT, DPT

Speaker Bios: Sydney Neumann, SPT is in her third and final year of the Doctor of Physical Therapy program at Pacific University. Sydney is a co-founder of the Early Career Bridge Program and a member of the APTA Oregon Government Affairs Committee. She is the former Vice President on the APTA Student Assembly Board of Directors and a past APTA Centennial Scholar. Sydney is passionate about community and public health and plans to work in an outpatient physical therapy setting upon graduation.

Tabitha Galindo, PT, DPT is an outpatient clinician with Adventist Health Portland and works as adjunct faculty for Pacific University School of Physical Therapy and Athletic Training. Tabitha serves on the APTA Oregon Delegation and co-founded the Early Career Bridge Program as a part of the APTA Centennial Scholar initiative. 

1:00 - 3:00 PM

Track C (2 CEUs)

Scheduling, CPT Coding, Billing, and Productivity: How They All Interrelate for Outpatient Therapy

Description: How you schedule your patients, the insurance your patient has, the type of condition the patient has that requires physical therapy, and the ability to use or not use support personnel all have an impact on the CPT codes you can bill for that patient visit, the number of units you can bill in a day, and, ultimately, your productivity and the financial success of your organization. In this session, attendees will learn various ways they can schedule their patients; including double booking and overlapping regardless of the insurance carrier; how to use support personnel, if allowed, to provide interventions under the appropriate and applicable supervision of the physical therapist; how to bill correctly based on the time spent with the patient providing skilled therapy interventions; and how this impacts productivity and, ultimately, the financial success of the organization. The speaker will discuss metrics PTs should be tracking on a weekly or monthly basis in their organization to ensure its financial success and explain how more units per visit may not always mean more money per visit.

Learning Objectives: 

  • Differentiate ways of scheduling patients and discuss how this impacts coding, billing, and productivity
  • Define “requires one-on-one patient contact” and explain how that impacts billing and productivity
  • Assess your current process of scheduling, billing, and productivity and compare it to what was taught in the session
  • Identify what financial data to analyze (units, visits, evaluations, etc) and interpret this data to determine the financial success or failure of your practice/organization.

Presenter: Rick Gawenda, PT

Speaker Bio: Rick Gawenda, P.T., graduated in 1991 with a Bachelor of Science in Physical Therapy from Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan. Mr. Gawenda is currently the President and founder of Gawenda Seminars & Consulting, Inc. He has provided valuable education and consulting to hospitals, rehabilitation agencies, private practices, nursing homes, and his peers in the areas of CPT and ICD-10 coding, billing, documentation, reimbursement, and compliance as it pertains to outpatient therapy services as well as denial management and the appeals process for Medicare denied claims. Mr. Gawenda’s website, www.gawendaseminars.com, provides a valuable source of information on rehabilitation rules and regulations, coding, documentation, and reimbursement. Mr. Gawenda is a member of the American Physical Therapy Association (APTA) and Michigan Physical Therapy Association (MPTA). Mr. Gawenda is the Past President of the Section on Health Policy & Administration of the APTA as well as Past President of the Michigan Association of Medical Rehabilitation Program Administrators. Mr. Gawenda is also the author of “The How-To Manual for Rehab Documentation: A Complete Guide to Increasing Reimbursement and Reducing Denials” and “Coding and Billing For Outpatient Rehab Made Easy: Proper Use of CPT Codes, ICD-9 Codes and Modifiers”.

2:00 PM – 3:00 PM

Track A (1 CEU)

The POWER to Prevent Falls with Parkinson's Disease

Description: Do we have the power to identify specific, evidence-based interventions for reducing falls in Parkinson’s disease? Recent advances in the literature highlight the benefits of power training for older adults. This creates an opportunity for clinicians and researchers to further our understanding of lower extremity power training as it relates to fall prevention for individuals with Parkinson’s disease. The intent of this workshop is to move research and clinical reasoning forward for more targeted fall-prevention interventions in Parkinson’s disease. This workshop will include a summary of previously published work, including a synthesis and review of current literature, as well as an introduction to newly published clinical practice guidelines related to the topic. Participants will identify emerging trends as well as gaps in the literature related to lower extremity power training and fall prevention in Parkinson’s disease.

Learning Objectives:

  • Participants can explain why falls are a public health concern.
  • Participants can describe how lower extremity power output relates to function in a general population of older adults according to recent literature.
  • Participants can describe current APTA Clinical Practice Guidelines (published December 28, 2021) for individuals with Parkinson's disease in the following domains: Aerobic Exercise; Resistance Training; Balance Training.
  • Participants can identify emerging trends and gaps in the literature related to the effectiveness of power training in individuals with Parkinson's disease for the purpose of fall prevention

Presenter: Kimberly Malin, PT, MSPT, DHSc

Speaker Bio: Kim Malin, PT, MS, DHSc (she/her) is a Board-Certified Neurologic Clinical Specialist since 2010. She is an Assistant Professor at Pacific University where she teaches Adult Neuromuscular System Examination & Intervention, Bioethics Seminar for Physical Therapists, and various interprofessional course electives. Research interests include the relationship between lower extremity power training and fall prevention in individuals with Parkinson’s disease, and equitable healthcare delivery for vulnerable populations. In her free time, Kim enjoys spending quality time with her family. Recreational interests include trail running, swimming, kayaking, stand-up-paddle boarding, skiing and tennis.

2:00 PM – 3:00 PM

Track B (1 CEU)

Blood Flow Restriction Training for PTs With Orthopaedic Conditions

Description: Blood flow restriction (BFR) training utilizes a tourniquet system to occlude blood flow while one performs exercise.  Patients who train with BFR are able to train at a lower load (e.g., 20-30% 1RM) while experiencing the benefits (i.e., increased strength and muscular size) associated with training at a heavier load.  This physiologic “trick” can help patients, who are unable to load heavy due to pain or surgery, to achieve gains that might not have been otherwise possible during their course of supervised therapy. BFR training is “new” to physical therapy practice having been popularized during the last 10 years. However, the research into BFR dates back decades. Physical therapists are utilizing BFR now for all types of orthopaedic conditions; however, the efficacy of using BFR for these conditions is mostly unknown.  In addition, research is warranted to identify the best treatment parameters.  The purpose of this presentation is to briefly review how BFR training works, highlight evidence supporting its use, and identify current gaps in the literature.  

Learning Objectives:

  • Describe the benefits associated with blood flow restriction training.
  • List physiologic mechanisms associated with the strength and size gains that occur during blood flow restriction training.
  • Highlight current evidence to support the use of BFR with orthopaedic physical therapy clients.
  • Identify gaps in the literature associated with blood flow restriction training.

Presenter: Dr. Jason Brumitt, PT, ATC, PhD

Speaker Bio: Jason Brumitt, PT, PhD, ATC, CSCS is an associate professor of physical therapy at George Fox University.  Dr. Brumitt’s primary areas of research are blood flow restriction (BFR) training and sports injury epidemiology.  Dr. Brumitt has published three manuscripts related to BFR training and is currently conducting two randomized controlled trials evaluating the effects of occlusion training on strength in recreational athletes, rotator cuff strength, and VO2 peak.  His presentation will highlight evidence supporting the use of BFR in orthopaedic rehabilitation and will illustrate current gaps in the literature.

3:30 PM - 4:30 PM Track A (1 CEU)

Gender Disparity in Stroke

Description: Stroke prevention, treatment, and mortality outcomes have improved significantly since the ground-breaking tPa and mechanical thrombectomy trials 26 and 6 years ago, respectively. Recently however, the number of patients dying from stroke has started increasing for the first time since the late 1980s. Recent research is noting sex-specific differences with stroke diagnosis, treatment, and rehabilitation outcomes. Unfavorable effects have been noted across the entire care model for women. This lecture will explore what those differences are and what risk factors are contributing to these changes. It will also explore how inpatient physical therapists can be part of the treatment solution and how outpatient therapists can be part of the prevention solution. Specific education and referral recommendations will be illustrated through two patient examples.

Learning Objectives:

  • Understand the differences in deaths and lifetime risk for stroke between women and men
  • Understand factors and symptoms that are women-specific leading to the above-mentioned differences
  • Discuss how to change how we educate our patients in the acute care and follow-up settings based on gender due to differing outcomes
  • Discuss how to make a resource list and other educational materials for this population

Presenter: Amy Ehrhart, PT, DPT, NCS

Speaker Bio: Amy has treated stroke patients across the west coast, her home state of Colorado, and all the way to Alaska throughout her 9-year career in IPR, SNF, and acute settings, including the ICU. Attending the 2020 International Stroke Conference inspired her to develop this presentation and create more prevention-based education for her patients. Away from work, she enjoys traveling and backpacking with her husband.

3:30 PM - 4:30 PM  Track B (1 CEU) 

Exercise Prescription for Persons with Osteoporosis

Description: 

Osteoporosis impacts 1 in 3 women and 1 in 5 men over the age of 50. Exercise for optimal bone health can be used in all therapy settings to prevent osteoporosis and/or negative impacts including pain and vertebral fractures. As physical therapists, we can guide our patients in fracture risk prevention, bone growth techniques as well as improve posture and strength. This course will review the research to determine beneficial exercise dosing for our patients, review traditional exercise impact on bone health as well as strategize ways to enhance current exercise programs for optimal movement and impact. We will review initial treatment ideas for beginners as well as discuss options for patients who are more advanced. The purpose of this course is for all clinicians to feel comfortable treating patients with osteoporosis as a primary diagnosis or as a complement to their rehab for prevention. 

Learning Objectives:

  • Discuss factors of health and exercise that influence bone fragility or strength
  • Appreciate potential outcomes for postural training, resistance exercise, balance training, safe movement and lifestyle modification in persons with osteoporosis provided through physical and occupational therapy interventions
  • Make recommendations for progression of prescriptive exercise in persons with osteoporosis
  • Discuss traditional workout methods impact on bone health and how to modify for greatest benefit

Presenter: Hannah Carlsen, PT, DPT, GCS, CEEAA

Speaker Bio: Hannah Carlsen graduated from Pacific University School of Physical Therapy in 2015 and then completed a Geriatric residency at the Mayo Clinic in Phoenix Arizona. She has worked in an outpatient hospital based clinic and recently transitioned to a private practice. Areas of interest for patient care include orthopedic complaints, osteoporosis, neurological conditions, balance and gait as well as golf related injuries. Hannah is the advocate for the Oregon Academy of Geriatric Physical Therapy through the APTA, where she focuses on spreading information about physical therapy directed at the Geriatric population.